Fun monk multiclass 5e

Hello fellow Nerdarchests. If you missed my previous article on the Fighter just click here. Today we are going in the dojo with the monk! As before I want to take up some space and talk about the class as a whole. It offers a variety of ways to address martial arts and characters that use them a defining path in their existence.

Themonk by far has the most options in combat with their Unarmored Defense and ability to deal deadly bludgeoning damage with only their bare hands and feet. Looking at the progression of the monk at 11th level they switch to a d8 for their Martial Arts damage and that is when they start to taper off as a combatant. This is when multiclassing will come into effect if you are not looking to the whole spiritual aspect of the monk. My first build I want to cover in this article is by far the most diverse, tough and very cliche.

Why druid? One, the druid relies on Wisdom as its main ability score and so do monks and two, the druid Circle of the Moon is perfect for this build. Let me elaborate. The monk caps their Martial Arts damage at 1d10 which can be used with any unarmed attack. At 11th level you reach 1d8, which is not far off as far as rolling damage goes. With that said onto the druid Circle of the Moon Circle Forms feature to change shape into any beast form with a challenge rating as high as your druid level divided by 3, rounded down.

At 6th level this means beasts up to CR 2. These beasts include ape, giant eagle, poisonous snake, giant constrictor snake, tiger and even the sabertooth tiger.

The Way of the Open Hand also provides the monk a way to heal themselves with Wholeness of Body and the Circle of the Moon allows the druid to spend spell slots to heal for 1d8 per spell slot level while in Wild Shape form. Aside from this the druid can cast beneficial spells to aid the party in combat. The base theme behind this character in my mind would be a wu jen practitioner of animal style kung fu, at least thematically speaking.

For this build you would go 12 levels of Way of the Open Hand monk and 8 levels of Circle of the Moon druid. This allows you to not miss every fourth level feat or ability score increase. This build uses the monk Way of Shadow and the paladin Oath of Vengeance together to create the ultimate combat mobility character who can control the battle field as well as heal their allies in a fight.

Paladin is a perfect fit to multiclass with the monk as it also uses Wisdom as a primary ability score.

Multi-Class Character Builds in Dungeons & Dragons 5e The Monk

The feats Polearm Master and Sentinel go great with this build allowing the monk to be in the right place at the right time with their Shadow Step feature from the Way of Shadow. Being able to teleport to any ally in a dark dungeon to heal them with Lay On Hands or a cure wounds spell can quickly turn the tide of battle.

The ability to heal themselves with spells and Lay on Hands can prove quite challenging to any opponent also. I find this build to be quite unique and fun to play and I hope you do as well.

The ranger was a proper fit for the monk multiclass in that it also utilizes Wisdom and Dexterity as primary ability scores. The ranger also grants the monk a Fighting Style. Both Dueling or Two-Weapon Fighting can be quite beneficial. All in all this build can be pretty devastating. Tune in next time when we will be taking a look at multiclass builds in Church of War with the paladin! What Constitutes Bad Roleplaying at the Tabletop?

Sure, your party just dethroned the tyrant, but I supplemented 5 levels of rogue assassinmaking my monk 9 and my paladin 6. I think this is an excellent build for a Charlatan or tyrant slayer character.Home Post new thread What's new Latest activity Authors. Wiki Pages Latest activity. Resources Latest reviews Search resources. Members Current visitors New profile posts Search profile posts. Log in Register. Search titles only.

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fun monk multiclass 5e

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For a better experience, please enable JavaScript in your browser before proceeding. Thread starter Zethnos Start date Sep 25, Zethnos Visitor. Greetings my fellow adventurers! This is not a "Which is best" contest. I hit google and come across some interesting things. I want to know, what multiclass combos you like that is very fun or plays in a unique way.

Please provide info as to some of the mechanics that you like that work together and some info about the build. Does not need to be a complete build. Also, please stay around 10th level when considering these. Yes they may be amazing at 20th level, but most campaigns don't make it that far.

D&D 5e Character Optimization – Monk

Yes it can be a multiclass of more than two classes. Last edited: Sep 26, OB1 Jedi Master. The fun comes in using Tides of Chaos with Eldrich Blast, and then using Frightful presence followed by Alter Self where I grow fangs and turn into a gnashing little ball of hate.

Of course, I also play in a campaign where character death is a real and constant threat, so who knows if I'll make it that far. IMO, 5e is full of fun combos that may not be optimal but are still very effective. OB1 said:. Right now I'm relying on purchasing very expensive Potions of Hill Giant Strength to make that combo effective.Lots of edits, formatting, additions and corrections. Character optimization guides:.

How does one Monk? A Monk is a fast, hit and run style character. They get in, they trash the place, and they get out. They are, without exception, the fastest class, and the only thing that could improve that is dipping two levels into Rogue for Cunning Action. Sky Blue : Optimal choice, core on all builds minus a fringe build or two. Blue : Solid pick, not exactly optimal but still a very good choice. Red : Nope.

Just nope. Wisdom — Your ability to spot the hidden, the saving throws you inflict, and a large portion of your AC will all come from your Wisdom. But more likely than not, you will get hit at some point. And have HP when you do is good. Strength : Thanks to your Martial Arts, you can completely ignore Strength in most cases. If, however, you want to make a Grappling Monk, this will be your main stat. Intelligence — Monks are wise, not book smart. But really, intelligence does nothing for you.

Dexterity and Wisdom are your two most important stats, normally in that order. That said, thanks to bounded accuracy it is possible to do well with any of the races. Aarakocra — I rated a race gold. Aarakocra make such good Monks it feels dirty. That said, having a feat can help.

Darkvision is always nice to have. Toughness is great. Wood Elf — Good stats, good speed. Darkvision is good. Keen Senses is good. Fey Ancestry is really good. Superior Hiding, not so much — generally you want to use your action for other stuff. Lucky lets you reroll a fumble, which is rare but useful. Better chances at not being Frightened Brave is good.For new players, choosing a single class for a character is a great introduction to the game. Not only does multiclassing provide variety, but adding a few levels in another class can give your character unique utility, alluring character development, and incredible damage output.

Reasons to Not Multiclass: Remember that a character can only reach a maximum total of 20 levels. Essentially, you may miss out on a great level 20 ability. Are the level abilities you might miss out on worth it?

If you hope to give your character additional versatility, you may be nerfing your overall utility. Let other players shine in their abilities while you shine in yours.

fun monk multiclass 5e

Reasons to Multiclass: We recommend multiclassing for these three reasons: to get armor proficiencies, to gain low-level class skills, or to fit a specific character archetype. So while there are a few downsides to multiclassing, choosing the right multiclass and number of levels to take is imperative. Easy Guide to Multiclassing. Multiclassing has one prerequisite: Your character must have compatible stats with the class you wish to multiclass into and the class you already have.

This means that you must meet the prerequisite stats for your current and new class. So if you take 3 levels Rogue and 4 levels Fighter, you are a level 7 character. Special Rules for Channel Divinity, Extra Attack, and Unarmored Defense: If you multiclass into a class that has one of these features while your current class already has this feature, you will not necessarily be able to stack your abilities.

See these specifics rules:. Spellcasting : There are two options for spellcasting: having only one spellcasting class and having more than one spellcasting class. What about Warlocks? Instead, follow this table to know which proficiencies you add:. There are additional Unearthed Arcana Prestige Class rules that we will not go into here.

Was this guide helpful? Are there any points that could use further clarification? Please comment below so that we can continue to create a helpful guide for our readers. The rest of your stat-building is dependent on your choice of character skills. Luckily, Fighters can be dex-based, so your stats are not wasted on this multiclass. Just make sure you have at least 13 strength to multiclass into Fighter!

Focus your stats on Charisma, which you will use for weapon attacks in lieu of Dexterity or Strength Hexblade Level 1: Hex Warrior ability. Remember, though, that you will need Strength or Dex 13 to multiclass into Fighter.

See you in the next post! Need help multiclassing?Multiclassing allows you to gain levels in multiple classes. Doing so lets you mix the abilities of those classes to realize a character concept that might not be reflected in one of the standard class options.

With this rule, you have the option of gaining a level in a new class whenever you advance in level, instead of gaining a level in your current class. Your levels in all your classes are added together to determine your character level. For example, if you have three levels in wizard and two in fighter, you're a 5th-level character. As you advance in levels, you might primarily remain a member of your original class with just a few levels in another class, or you might change course entirely, never looking back at the class you left behind.

You might even start progressing in a third or fourth class. Compared to a single-class character of the same level, you'll sacrifice some focus in exchange for versatility. To qualify for a new class, you must meet the ability score prerequisites for both your current class and your new one, as shown in the Multiclassing Prerequisites table.

For example, a barbarian who decides to multiclass into the druid class must have both Strength and Wisdom scores of 13 or higher. Without the full training that a beginning character receives, you must be a quick study in your new class, having a natural aptitude that is reflected by higher-than-average ability scores.

fun monk multiclass 5e

The experience point cost to gain a level is always based on your total character level, as shown in the Character Advancement table, not your level in a particular class. You gain the hit points from your new class as described for levels after 1st. You gain the 1st-level hit points for a class only when you are a 1st-level character.

You add together the Hit Dice granted by all your classes to form your pool of Hit Dice. If the Hit Dice are the same die type, you can simply pool them together.

If your classes give you Hit Dice of different types, keep track of them separately. Your proficiency bonus is always based on your total character level, not your level in a particular class. When you gain your first level in a class other than your initial class, you gain only some of new class's starting proficiencies, as shown in the Multiclassing Proficiencies table.

When you gain a new level in a class, you get its features for that level. You don't, however, receive the class's starting equipment, and a few features have additional rules when you're multiclassing: Channel Divinity, Extra Attack, Unarmored Defense, and Spellcasting. If you already have the Channel Divinity feature and gain a level in a class that also grants the feature, you gain the Channel Divinity effects granted by that class, but getting the feature again doesn't give you an additional use of it.

You gain additional uses only when you reach a class level that explicitly grants them to you. Whenever you use the feature, you can choose any of the Channel Divinity effects available to you from your two classes. If you gain the Extra Attack class feature from more than one class, the features don't add together. You can't make more than two attacks with this feature unless it says you do as the fighter's version of Extra Attack does.

Similarly, the warlock's eldritch invocation Thirsting Blade doesn't give you additional attacks if you also have Extra Attack. Your capacity for spellcasting depends partly on your combined levels in all your spellcasting classes and partly on your individual levels in those classes.

Once you have the Spellcasting feature from more than one class, use the rules below. If you multiclass but have the Spellcasting feature from only one class, you follow the rules as described in that class. Spells Known and Prepared. You determine what spells you know and can prepare for each class individually, as if you were a single-classed member of that class. As 3rd-level wizard, you know three wizard cantrips, and your spellbook contains ten wizard spells, two of which the two you gained when you reached 3rd level as a wizard can be 2nd-level spells.

If your Intelligence is 16, you can prepare six wizard spells from your spellbook. Each spell you know and prepare is associated with one of your classes, and you use the spellcasting ability of that class when you cast the spell.Hello fellow Nerdarchests. If you missed my previous article on the Fighter just click here.

Today we are going in the dojo with the monk! As before I want to take up some space and talk about the class as a whole. It offers a variety of ways to address martial arts and characters that use them a defining path in their existence.

Themonk by far has the most options in combat with their Unarmored Defense and ability to deal deadly bludgeoning damage with only their bare hands and feet. Looking at the progression of the monk at 11th level they switch to a d8 for their Martial Arts damage and that is when they start to taper off as a combatant.

This is when multiclassing will come into effect if you are not looking to the whole spiritual aspect of the monk. My first build I want to cover in this article is by far the most diverse, tough and very cliche. Why druid? One, the druid relies on Wisdom as its main ability score and so do monks and two, the druid Circle of the Moon is perfect for this build.

Let me elaborate. The monk caps their Martial Arts damage at 1d10 which can be used with any unarmed attack. At 11th level you reach 1d8, which is not far off as far as rolling damage goes. With that said onto the druid Circle of the Moon Circle Forms feature to change shape into any beast form with a challenge rating as high as your druid level divided by 3, rounded down.

At 6th level this means beasts up to CR 2. These beasts include ape, giant eagle, poisonous snake, giant constrictor snake, tiger and even the sabertooth tiger. The Way of the Open Hand also provides the monk a way to heal themselves with Wholeness of Body and the Circle of the Moon allows the druid to spend spell slots to heal for 1d8 per spell slot level while in Wild Shape form.

Aside from this the druid can cast beneficial spells to aid the party in combat. The base theme behind this character in my mind would be a wu jen practitioner of animal style kung fu, at least thematically speaking. For this build you would go 12 levels of Way of the Open Hand monk and 8 levels of Circle of the Moon druid. This allows you to not miss every fourth level feat or ability score increase. This build uses the monk Way of Shadow and the paladin Oath of Vengeance together to create the ultimate combat mobility character who can control the battle field as well as heal their allies in a fight.

Paladin is a perfect fit to multiclass with the monk as it also uses Wisdom as a primary ability score. The feats Polearm Master and Sentinel go great with this build allowing the monk to be in the right place at the right time with their Shadow Step feature from the Way of Shadow.

D&D Tips: Multiclassing Like A Pro

Being able to teleport to any ally in a dark dungeon to heal them with Lay On Hands or a cure wounds spell can quickly turn the tide of battle. The ability to heal themselves with spells and Lay on Hands can prove quite challenging to any opponent also. I find this build to be quite unique and fun to play and I hope you do as well. The ranger was a proper fit for the monk multiclass in that it also utilizes Wisdom and Dexterity as primary ability scores.

The ranger also grants the monk a Fighting Style. Both Dueling or Two-Weapon Fighting can be quite beneficial. All in all this build can be pretty devastating. Tune in next time when we will be taking a look at multiclass builds in Church of War with the paladin!

My 5 Favorite Multiclassing Ideas for D&D 5e

I supplemented 5 levels of rogue assassinmaking my monk 9 and my paladin 6. I think this is an excellent build for a Charlatan or tyrant slayer character. Either works really depends on what you want. Both increase damage and give interesting options.They may, at times, devolve the game into a statistics exercise. Those are the kind of character builds on this list. Just remember, some of these builds on the list may result in the DM banning your character on the spot, consider yourself warned.

Now you have a total of 19 AC, and that's without a class. This build is considered legal, and shouldn't have too many issues at the table. The Rogue is generally a good class at low levels and can be a decent addition to any multiclass build. You would have to multiclass or be hasted in order to get two attacks in a single round.

The problem is if you ever end up in a fight without a sneak attack opportunity, you'll be hiding behind your party most of the combat. Taking a fighter with crossbow expert and sharpshooter, you'll need to cross-class into the hex blade warlock from Xanathar's Guide.

You'll also want the spell hex. This build is both pretty cool and fits well in most settings, definitely worth using, and it's unlikely the DM will ban the character.

Some people really like the monk, and there's a lot to like, Ki points, decent stealth, and unarmed damage to name a few. The problem is that its subclasses are really lacking and the addition of others has not improved the class's playability.

Its elemental subclass really feels underwhelming when played and its Ki attacks don't really punch the way they should. The open hand doesn't really add to much combat power, nothing that taking the fighter wouldn't have given already. If you are proficient in persuasion if you're a bard you should beDiplomat will also double your proficiency bonus on persuasion checks.

Then at level 17, you add your bardic inspiration to this check. The opposing party will have to make a will save not to be charmed. The lowest you will likely role is You could probably talk a door into unlocking itself at this point.

The barbarian can also be a good choice in multiclassing and if buffed appropriately could potentially get some of the incredible AC at later levels. The barbarian just suffers from a lack of sustain as a tank. There's no problem in playing a Barbarian, its fun to yell at the table and be verbose, it's just not as efficient in its role as other classes can be.

This one might cause the DM to ban you at the table. That's 40HP in a 1st level spell slot that can be divided amongst a party. This creates a healing machine and kinda abuses the mechanics of the game.

Your DM may give the stink eye when you pull this. Most DM's and players love homebrew classes because it's something unique and adds to the story. It's not easy to find a balanced homebrew, so it's going to fall into one of two categories, overpowered or underpowered. Chances are, the DM will only allow one of these two. Letting this seemingly harmless thought roll around and stew in the back of their mind, "What if I just, cross classed into, EVERY class?

Imagine this, basic abilities of every class at level one, all at fingertips a level twelve adventurer. The power to do no one thing remotely well and to do everything else very badly. Stats that only align to two or three of their classes, causing the majority of their abilities to suffer penalties instead of bonuses.

This true psion of madness will have neither a multi-attack nor a single subclass. Hopefully, no one out there is mad enough to try such a thing, or are they?